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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/19/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    SystronicsRF

    System backup

    The approach adopted for backing up and recovering the system is outlined below. We are currently intervening at the point when the automated recovery is started, mainly to monitor the process. This intervention will be removed in due course. To date, only @Terminal has needed to recover his system. Apart from needing to remove and replace the batteries in a few devices, his system was recovered 100%, and he was able to continue using it without any loss of data, settings, or history. Automatic Backup All of the settings, the current data & the logs are backed up hourly, daily, weekly & monthly to the user’s secure area in Cloud. The backed up content is retained for up to 12 months, depending on the period covered by the backed up content, after which time it is deleted automatically. Manual Restoration If the system needs to be restored, a Micro SD can be flashed, and the Raspberry Pi can also be replaced, if the user wishes to do so. The Pi is booted up, and the USB network adapters are re-attached to the Raspberry Pi. The version of the backed up data to be restored is selected, and the automatic recovery is initiated. Automatic Recovery The selected version of the Control System is downloaded, and all of the backed-up data, including the device profiles and the historical data is restored automatically. All of the device connections, the Apps, Activators, Actions, etc. are all restored automatically. This leaves the Control System fully functional, without any further manual intervention, and its operation continues where it left off. USB Memory Device The Iris camera video recordings are being saved to a memory device plugged into one of the Raspberry Pi’s USB ports. This can be anything from a memory stick to a hard drive. Once this facility has been released, this same USB memory device will also be made usable for the local storage of the system back-ups, which removes any reliance on the Cloud. The complete back up set, covering all time periods, requires about 2.5GB.
  2. 3 points
    As the Iris videos for pairing and factory resetting devices have been removed, we have included them in our YouTube channel. We have uploaded about 90 videos. The playlists are organized by manufacturer, to reduce the number of thumbnails that are displayed: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkuwjOnhv5RMr4UwvBs-9jA/playlists
  3. 1 point
    SystronicsRF

    My Apps

    My Apps are Home Automation Apps (HA-Apps), not to be confused with Mobile Apps. The user configures an App to meet each of their home automation needs. There is no limit to the number of Apps that a user can create. No coding is required, and no add-ons, widgets, special hubs, bridges, etc., are required. The Apps are created locally by the user in their home, using a laptop, desktop, or tablet. No internet connection is needed, and nothing has to be drawn from the Cloud. A library of example Apps is provided, but users can fully customize each of their Apps to suit their individual needs. Existing users have already created many Apps to automate their home in many ways, including lighting, HVAC, security, wellbeing, and energy consumption. These range from the relatively simple, such as setting mood lighting, to very sophisticated security systems. Each App is a self-contained set of interconnected building blocks. There are two types of building block; Advanced Activators and Advanced Actions. Each Advanced Activator enables the user to define a user interface, in the form of either a tile or a dashboard pane. The Advanced Actions do all of the work. They each take data from Sensors, such as motion, contact, etc., and send commands to other Advanced Actions, and to Actuators, such as smart plugs, light switches, etc. The following is a video to illustrate a simple App for turning on a fan heater based on temperature in a room. Users only need to select where to measure the temperature and the plug that powers the heater. This can then be used as is, or customized as required.
  4. 1 point
    Smittysmit

    Alexa for SystronicsRF

    Any clue when Alexa will be active? It's a major factor in my house.
  5. 1 point
    Otto Mation

    CR123A Batteries

    I second this suggestion. Stock up on all the batteries you will need for a while, all will be priced about as cheap as anywhere online, and when your order hits $50 you will get free shipping too.
  6. 1 point
    scunny

    CR123A Batteries

    batteryjunction.com Their house brand Titanium are very good and about a buck apiece.
  7. 1 point
    Did you still need help with this? Like you, I reviewed their examples, and while the logic made sense to me, I couldn't for the life of me find out how to actually get to the end result because I didn't know what to click on or how the rule machine creation interface actually flowed. I only have about 20 rules created as of now - yes, some of us are very busy and don't have time with work to spend a lot of time reading the manuals. So I would create 1-2 rules every month or so and my rules are in v1, 2, 3, and now v4 of RM. It seemed like once I got an understanding of what to click on in a particular version, they upgraded RM. It's nice to keep it updated but for those of us who don't create that many rules, it can be frustrating to have to spend hours trying to find how to actually create the rules when it changes. And when you ask a question on the forums, it is a crap shoot on whether you will actually get help or if they will just refer you to a post that has 1100+ responses and say "look at the examples". So, after getting that exact response from someone on a forum, I had to sit down and try to figure out the flow of the creation myself. If you still would like to see how this is done in RM4, I can give you some examples and how to get to the end result. Bear in mind, I only have 4 rules, so my examples won't be as extensive as on the forums but if what you are looking for is what to click on within RM, I think even just one may help you wrap your head around it.
  8. 1 point
    Thank you! I went looking for these a week or so ago and was quite distressed to discover they had been lifted. Very insightful and fortuitous on your part. Well done !
  9. 1 point
    Terminal

    System backup

    So the SystronicsRF system has at least one huge, IMO, advantage over my ST system. For some reason the SD card on my system crashed. It would not boot and I was dead in the water. I bought a new SD card installed the a new control system then SystronicsRF was able to put my system back just as it was before it crashed. All my rules and devices came back just as they were. I had to go around to some of my V1 sensors and remove and re-install the battery, which could be a bit of a pain on a large system but beats the crap out of starting from scratch.
  10. 1 point
    Terminal

    System backup

    I don't think there really is at this point. I asked about this back during the beta testing. As I would like to keep my own copy. The guys are very responsive but I would like to have a ready to pop in backup of the SD card. What they said back then was, they keep hourly backups of your system and 14 days of a nightly backup. They said they would offer the ability to download a system backup directly from your CS at some point, but that point has yet to arrive.
  11. 1 point
    Systronics RF has significantly opened up uses for the Iris Gen 1 Key Pad as compared to its use in the Iris platform. This post is limited to describing the 10 different sounds from the Gen 1 key pad that can be assigned to Actions in the SRF Control System. Here's the list of names, with a subjective attempt to describe the sounds emitted: 1. Alarm: two-tone siren, British style 2. Armed: 3 fast beeps, high (freq.) tone 3. Arming: 3 slow beeps, medium tone 4. Bad Pin: 2 beeps, fast/slow, medium then low tone, repeated once 5. Home: 3 ascending beep tones, repeated once 6. Key Click: 1 beep, high tone 7. Locked: 2 quick low tones 8. Lost Hub: 2 long low tones 9. Night: 6 high tones 10. Open Door: (same as #1) 11. Panic: very rapidly repeated two-tone beeps, high freq. (like a cordless phone used to sound)
  12. 1 point
    SystronicsRF

    Iris Cameras

    As most Iris users probably know, Iris cameras are designed and manufactured by the Chinese company, Sercomm. These Sercomm cameras are resold by many other organizations throughout the world. For this reason, they are manufactured in much larger quantities than would be the case if they were only resold through Lowe’s. As anyone with a knowledge of manufacturing electronic equipment is aware, larger production volumes mean higher product reliability and lower production costs. We became aware of the size of the market in these camera when we mistakenly purchased a RC8221 that had been resold by ADT in South Africa. Not knowing the default password, we were unable to gain access to it. We do not know the full extent of Sercomm’s international penetration with its cameras, but it is certainly worldwide, and goes well beyond just Iris and ADT, which in itself has an international presence. We currently have 2 x OC 821, 3 x RC8221 and 5 x OC830 Iris cameras in use, all of which were purchased pre-owned via eBay. They all function perfectly, and consistently within each camera type. Neither Sercomm, nor any of the resellers, make the camera configuration information readily available. Many people have gleaned what information they can, and have hacked their cameras sufficiently to get them operational for their own purposes. We faced a slightly different situation, because we needed to gain a full understanding of them, so that we could cater for all aspects of their operation with the Control System. After extensive research on the Internet, and a lot of trial and error testing, we are now able to exercise 100% control over all three camera types. In total, across all three camera types, there are nearly 550 individual Parameters that can be set. While some Parameters are just two state, true or false, others have multiple selections, and others require actual values to be entered. There are also Parameters that have to be set in combination with other Parameters. It is anticipated that other types of Sercomm camera will have similar Parameter settings. Although they may evolve with the introduction of new products, as happened in going from the OC821 to the OC830, there is a limit to the extent that they can be changed. This large number of settings reflects the inherent capability of these very smart cameras, which are capable of satisfying many diverse requirements as standalone devices. Fortunately, much of this functionality is handled already within the Control System. The Control System also applies most of the settings automatically, when it configures a camera. This leaves only the essential manual settings that need to be exposed to the user. We are now able to deliver the full camera functionality, which is being introduced gradually to a small number of users, prior to being made more widely available. This functionality includes: Fully integrated with the Control System at device level. Fully integrated with Advanced Actions, such as trigger alarms, generate alerts, control lights, etc., in response to video motion detection and audio level detection. Multi-video streaming to local Dashboards, with users being able to design as many different dashboards as they need. Recording to a memory device, which can be anything from a memory stick to a hard drive, plugged into the Raspberry Pi’s USB port. Full screen streaming at higher resolution and higher frame rates with two-way audio. Recordings triggered by IR and video detected motion, and audio level. Scheduling video recordings. Full screen viewing of recorded videos. Management of recorded videos, archiving, deleting, etc. Adjustable camera settings, including video quality, frame rate, camera orientation, and IR. Use of the Cloud Console for remote access for streaming and viewing recorded videos. With a maximum resolution of 720p, frame rates of up to 30fps, rich colors, and the ability to adjust their brightness, contrast, and color settings, and audio streaming, these cameras are more than adequate for security purposes. Unfortunately, the performance of any WiFi camera can be degraded by the bandwidth limitation imposed by the WiFi network. If the network is unable to handle the data being delivered by a camera, then the stream becomes fragmented, delayed, and may fail completely. The user is faced with striking the best balance between improving their WiFi network, to achieve a higher bandwidth, and reducing the resolution and frame rate of the cameras. We are feeding the streams from 10 Iris cameras into a multi-screen Dashboard. The cameras are set to a low resolution (320 x 240 pixels), and a low frame rate (10 frames per second). Even so, to achieve smooth reliable streaming, we had to make significant improvements to our DrayTek based WiFi network. This included the addition of more routers / access points, and the use of powerline adapters. We have also included a snapshot option, as an alternative to streaming, to cater for the bandwidth limitations on some users’ WiFi networks. This option reduces the load on the network by only sending a static image periodically, and with the user being able to select the optimum period.
  13. 1 point
    SystronicsRF

    Iris Cameras

    If you’re just connecting a WiFi printer to your desktop computer, then installing it is a fairly straightforward plug-and-play procedure. If, on the other hand, you are using many different WiFi devices as part of a home automation system, then it gets more complicated. Video and audio feeds from WiFi cameras place particularly high loads on WiFi networks. If the bandwidth of the WiFi network is inadequate, then the quality of these feeds is degraded. This network degradation can also interfere with the operation of other devices, such as switching a WiFi plug on or off. Fortunately, the amount of data being transmitted to and from these devices is relatively small, so it’s most likely that they will continue to function. The transmission delays caused by the network degradation, which will normally last a few seconds, or less, will also probably go unnoticed. It can, nevertheless, cause these devices to stop communicating. The connection between the user’s cell phone, tablet, or other similar device, and the Control System is also likely to be via the home WiFi network. As the user walks round their home, the distance between their cell phone and the nearest WiFi hotspot will vary, and the WiFi hotspot to which the cell phone is connected will change. Again, this is not too important if the cell phone is just being used to switch a plug on or off. Video streaming on the other hand can be disrupted in these circumstances. The ability of the WiFi network to support the video streaming also drops off much more rapidly as the user moves their cell phone away for the nearest WiFi hotspot, than it does when controlling a smart plug, or similar device. The simplest indication of the performance of a WiFi network is obtained by sending a small packet of data from the Home LAN to each camera, and measuring the round-trip time for the packet to reach the camera, and then be returned to the LAN. This technique is known as Pinging, and the round-trip time is known as the Latency. Leaving aside the jargon, and the technicalities, this round-trip time must be less than 10 milliseconds if the video from the camera is to stream smoothly at 30 frames per second, especially when viewing multiple camera feeds. At the other extreme, if the round-trip time is more than about 100 milliseconds, then the camera can only be used in a snapshot mode, with images being sent every few seconds. Once the round-trip time approaches one second, the camera becomes unusable. The Control System automatically measures and reports the round-trip time for each camera, so that the user can decide whether to improve the performance of their WiFi network, or settle for lower resolution images that are sent less often. Similar considerations apply to recorded videos, but to a lesser degree. There has been a recent trend towards installing a WiFi hotspot in most rooms of the home in a mesh configuration, and certainly those rooms that are normally occupied, We have attempted to use Range Extenders operating in a mesh configuration to link two cameras located in a sunroom in the rear yard to the main WiFi hub. Even with 4 Range Extenders, at a total cost of just under $80, they had to be spaced closer together than we had expected, were unpredictable in their operation, and were unable to deliver the bandwidth required by the cameras. We abandoned these Range Extenders in favour of a local WiFi Router in the sunroom connected to the main LAN via a Powerline Extension. This has proved to be very reliable, and provides a more than adequate bandwidth for the cameras. The combined cost of the WiFi Router and the Powerline Extension was less than $60. These were all TP-Link devices. Notionally, it sounds like a good idea to have a WiFi mesh. After all, they’ve been doing it for years with ZigBee and Z-Wave. Not so, in our opinion. Perhaps because WiFi was never intended to be operated as a mesh, and consequently lacks the underlying network protocol. Unlike the ZigBee and Z-Wave networks, which are encapsulated by the Control System, WiFi devices share the WiFi network with other devices in the home. As with any shared system, conflicts can arise. The WiFi environment is also very dynamic, due to it being used for other purposes throughout the day, such as streaming on demand video services, like Netflix and Amazon Prime in the evening.
  14. 1 point
    As noted above by Pavalov, the 1st Generation Iris keypad was fully integrated into the Control System in April this year. At the time, we produced the following audio track to illustrate the range of tones available: - Click Here to Download - Click Here to Play Many users have since included / re-included this keypad as part their security system, and some users are running two of them. They are able to control other devices with the keypad, such as sounding the Utilitech siren, switching a plug or a light on, as well as using it to issue a particular tone in response to a button being pressed, a door being opened, or motion being detected. Although it was designed in about 2012, it is still preferred by many ex-Iris users to the more modern version. Users also missed the control that they had previously over the chime tones, which was removed from the later versions of the Iris system. This keypad was manufactured by the Taiwanese company, Everspring. This is a specialist manufacturer of this type of keypad, as well as other smart devices, which it also sells under its own brand. These include other versions of the keypad, as well as a wide range of other ZigBee and Z-Wave devices. This accounts for the high quality of this unit, and its usability, because these reflect Everspring’s extensive experience in the design and manufacture of this type of unit. We have also bought 7 of these 1st generation keypads, and we make extensive use of them. They were all pre-owned units purchased through eBay, and are all fully functional, which is testament to the manufacturing quality of this unit. These keypads are still selling on eBay at $20.00 or less, and are an excellent value for money. It is also rumored that one user has their system set up with the code “1999”, after the line from the Prince song “So tonight I’m gonna party like it’s 1999”. Entering this code causes all of the lights in the house to light up. As well as controlling the individual chime tones, the number of chimes that are issued, and their volume can both be specified within the Control System. Each button is also individually detected by the Control System, which can be configured to respond to the On, Off, Partial, Panic, *, and # buttons individually. It can also be configured to respond to the entry of a PIN number, which can be of any length, either with or without another button, such as the On button, being pressed. In writing this post, we were reminded that one of the Gamma Users drew our attention in August to a couple of Iris features that we still need to add, and which we have now included in our To-do list. These are to indicate the alarm state by illuminating a particular button when any key is pressed, and to illuminate the LED above the numeric keys when the alarm is triggered.