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  1. My .02 Cents. V02 - Bad Idea.

    they are based on the same low power wireless protocols, so they should. i will let you know. The Vera Plus is set to arrive middle of next week, apparently manufacturing couldn't keep up with demand so it was back ordered. I'll let you know how things go.
  2. My .02 Cents. V02 - Bad Idea.

    This is my first post. I came here with high hopes of finding some answers, which I found, though they were very disappointing answers. I'm now hoping someone from Iris/Lowes will see this and fire some folks. With that said, I realize that this post will get the usual "who is this guy", "who does this guy think he is", etc., but all I care about is the Iris/Lowe's person who says "Darn, wish we had talked to our consumers more and leveraged things like Big Data to collect consumer utilization data". Furthermore, I realize that there are folks in this forum that are compensated one way or another by Iris/Lowe's to provide "friendly" posts, so if this is you, just don't even bother with a reply. Without going into too much detail, I am incredibly tech aware, as it's been my career for nearly two decades, so nothing I'm about to post can be considered "user error". So I'll start with this thought - who's heard of a concept called "MVP"? It has nothing to do with sports. In this context, it stands for Minimally Viable Product. It's a concept of development and consumer testing; companies such as Toyota have helped perfect it over years. In this case, it's a joke. MVPs are most often used to test a NEW product, not a replacement product for a consumer device that has worked well. In this case, Iris/Lowe's created an MVP for a replacement product that was a complete joke! I was a V1 user for a long time. I paid for the premium subscription for more than two years and constantly raved about Iris to my colleagues and friends. I loved it. Was I a guy with 2-300 devices connected? Absolutely not, but I used it for security and a few other features. My primary reasons for using this product were simple: I wanted to know when a door/window was opened (i.e. notification and door/window chime), I wanted to be notified when a leak sensor was tripped, and I wanted the smart thermostat. Iris V1 was perfect! It worked well, was pretty reliable (minus the stupid requirements for direct connection to the router), and the mobile app did what I needed it too. I was happy, and paid my bills every month knowing it was worth it. Then the V2 came out. I was one of the first to submit my request for the V2 hub and was excited. When I received it and realized that the morons who wrote the code didn't start with the concept of migration, I waited. Thank GOD I did. So finally the migration method was made available and I finally had the time to go through it. I decided to take the plunge! That's when the issues really started. Just like so many others in the forums, I felt that the lack of a web-based management portal could be dealt with, as I had hoped the mobile app provided the same functionality. Immediately I realized that wasn't the case, as troubleshooting issues became nearly impossible (what's funny about this is if you're properly writing apps, starting with a functional web-app and porting it to a mobile app isn't that difficult anymore. If it is, then take a look at Pivotal Cloud Foundry as a tool to help). Then to find out that several of my devices, simple things such as a range extender, wouldn't work properly (found this out after three support calls). It just got worse from there, so rather than lots of paragraphs, I'll just list them out: 1) Simple physical things: Immediately I noticed that Iris/Lowe's didn't even consider what their customers may have done from a physical installation perspective. The V2 hub didn't even have mounting holes that matched the V1? What about consumers who specially mounted this in their network closet or mini-IDF? 2) Next, they decided (no real reason for it except to again force the consumers hand) to change the power supply and power connection. What about the consumers who ran their power cords through cable management systems? 3) No web app for your consumers who prefer that. This is obvious. 4) Devices that worked on the V1 were not supported on V2, even though the V2 hub still supported the same protocols. 5) Changed the door/window chime without giving the consumer a way to change it back, including the removal of the volume control. This is completely stupid and unnecessary. If anything, they should have given the consumer more sound choices and greater control. 6) The migration process. Seriously, yeah it moved my devices, but didn't warn me about ones that wouldn't work properly. Second, the disclaimer about "disables your V1 hub" is a joke. When you say disable, most people read that as yes it's disabled, but support should be able to re-enable it. The fact that it's truly disabled and cannot be reused is a joke! It gives the consumer no backout strategy. This was the last straw for me. There's more, but those are the big ones. The fact that I have no backout strategy and they've already announced the EOSL dates for the V1 tells me this: Iris/Lowe's found a vulnerability in their system that probably has an easy to recreate and find exploit that they have determined un-fixable in their architecture. This is why they are forcing every user into a piece of crap. After all of this, I immediately cancelled my subscription and deleted every device so I can reuse them on a consumer friendly device. I immediately ordered the Vera Plus and will never look back (even though I don't have it yet). I've spent a small fortune over the years with Lowe's, and I would have expected much more from them. Sure hope this helps others in their decisions when looking at home automation systems. Oh yeah, and I have a V2 Hub, barely used if anyone wants it, 10 bucks plus shipping and its yours, just PM me.