Compan-1

Members
  • Content count

    22
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1
  1. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    Now posting under a new SystronicsRF account.
  2. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    The short answer to your Alexa question is "Yes". The system will have Alexa skills, and we are aware of those provided by Iris. We will get back to you with more details.
  3. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    The new website went live last week at: https://www.systronicsrf.com Also, please see my post above about IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's thread.
  4. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    The new website went live last week at: https://www.systronicsrf.com Also, please see my post above about IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's thread.
  5. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    The new website went live last week at: https://www.systronicsrf.com Also, please see my post above about IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's thread.
  6. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    Someone started this thread, so we are responding to both:
  7. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    We have added these pages, which should contain the answer. If not, then please get back to us. https://www.systronicsrf.com/installation/network-adapters.html https://www.systronicsrf.com/installation/hub-configuration.html We are planning release of Beta version for testing in mid-January.
  8. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    By hub, we are referring to the Pi + SD + Network Adapters. It doesn’t have to be a Pi, providing that it is capable of supporting .Net. The Pi runs Microsoft sponsored Mono, the cross platform, open source, .Net framework. Technically, if the device is capable of supporting the full Microsoft .Net framework, then you can use it instead. We are currently only supporting the Pi, but we will probably be looking at other platforms in the future. We are exploiting the full capability of the Pi, including its quad core processor, through multi-threading, which has proved more than capable in our testing.
  9. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    I'm still not sure how to use this forum, but I'm attempting to respond to sparc's post. Our phones also switch automatically between cellular and home WiFi, but we've never tried it for geolocation. We will test it, but I suspect it may be too close and too variable.
  10. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    As some of you have already discovered, the SystronicsRF.com website is live. We will be adding more content, especially for registered users, over the next few days and weeks. We will highlight the additions as they become available. We welcome your comments and questions.
  11. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    The short answer to your Geofencing questions is “Yes”, the system does have this capability. To work, the mobile phone has to be online to the web server, because it has to deliver the current GPS location data instantaneously to the server. This requires a remote connection between the mobile phone and the web server. The type of app should not have any bearing on the performance that you mentioned. It’s probably due more to the implementation of the action running on the server, or possible weaknesses in the mobile phone / server connection. In our system, the hub is the web server. Whether the mobile phone connects to the hub via the local home WiFi, or remotely, via the internet, the operation is identical. To provide the GPS data, the mobile phone first needs to have its location services enabled. Any app, or web browser, running on the mobile phone, can then access the phone’s GPS data. This GPS data is then forwarded to the server for comparison with the home location within an action. The result of the comparison between the home location and the GPS location of the mobile phone determines the distance from home, which then triggers an event within the system, such as switching on the heating. It’s probably worth clarifying the different types of app, because the term “app” tends to be a source of confusion. There are three main types of app: A native app, which is programmed to run on a specific type of device, such as Android, and does not require an internet connection. A hybrid app, which is one that employs multi-platform technologies, such as HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, and is normally used as a wrapper for a web app. A web app, which is no more than a website using responsible website design technology, so that the page layout can be adapted to suit the smaller screen of a mobile device. It just requires a web browser running on the mobile phone as the user interface We have developed both hybrid apps and web apps. The main benefit of the hybrid app is that it can operate stand-alone, and without being connected to a server. A web app can also be operated partially stand-alone, by employing the HTML5 offline mode to cache the server data locally. The only other difference between a hybrid app and web app is that the user has to download the core of the hybrid app from an app store, whereas a web app just needs a link to the server program from within the web browser on the mobile phone. Even if a hybrid app is used, it is often just used as a wrapper round a web app, because most of the functionality is in the web app. Home automation needs a hybrid app for Geofencing, because the mobile phone has to be in communication with the web server, so that the live GPS data can be sent immediately to the web server for processing. the hybrid app running on the mobile phone merely sends this data to the server in the same way as any other browser request. SystronicsRF
  12. Compan-1

    IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??

    We are system designers / software developers. We plan to supply only the software, which you can run on a Raspberry Pi 3B / 3B+. The email in the earlier post from Vettester provides much more detail about the system, but a couple of points of clarification have also arisen: 1. Network Adapters You will also need a separate USB dongle adapter for each network that you use. That is, for AlertMe (Gen1) ZigBee, HA (Gen2) ZigBee and Z-Wave. These plug directly into the Pi. We will list the specific adapters that we’ve tested successfully so far on the website, and we will be testing more of them. A WiFi interface, which is already built-in to the Pi, provides a protected WiFi network separate from the normal home WiFi, in a similar way to these other networks. 2. Server Role Although we have mentioned this in our email, it’s probably worth repeating that the in-home part of the system runs self-contained, and without any reliance on the cloud, or an internet connection. This includes the everyday use, such as switching devices on and off, the design of the automated actions, adding devices, and the setting up of the features for the everyday use of the system. If the user wants to control the system remotely, then the hub can accept requests directly from a remotely located mobile device, still without involving the server. The hub software safeguards the security of the system with a firewall, which can be locked down to specific mobile devices, and by validating all of the requests from the mobile device. These requests from the mobile device can instead be routed via the server, for enhanced system security. The hub then only accepts requests from the server, and all of the requests from the mobile device are routed via the server. The Microsoft Azure firewall, a software firewall on the server, and server validation of the mobile device requests then provide an additional layer of security. The user determines the mode to use via a setting in the hub software. SystronicsRF
  13. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    In parallel with completing the development and testing of the system, we have been working with partners on specific niche applications. The recent news about Iris has prompted us to put all of our energies back into enabling the continued use of the earlier Iris and AlertMe devices for HA, alongside the more recent devices. A new website, SysTronicsRF.com, will be put online by the end of next week, December 7th. The website describes the system features, how it can be used, and the thinking behind our approach, which we have also mentioned in previous posts. Its content will also be expanded over time. The target date for the release of a Beta version is mid-January, and we and we will explain the procedure for accessing this version ahead of time. We are providing more information by email to those of you who have registered their interest in using the system via the video pages. You will also be able to register your interest via the new website.
  14. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    We have tested a range of different devices from several manufacturers, as you may have seen from the last posted video. We have created profiles (handlers) for each of these devices. When any devices of these types join the network, their profile us presented a standardised interface to the control system. We have developed in-house tools to expedite and simplify this profiling. These tools can be made available for users to develop profiles for their own devices, although we will need to improve the user interface beforehand.
  15. Compan-1

    Don't Throw Away Your Old Devices

    The Iris Gen 1 devices that we have tested successfully so far are: Door / window sensor Item # 388558 Model # DWS901 Motion detector Item # 388557 Model # MOT501 Smart plug Item # 388564 Model # SPG902 Alarm key fob Item # 388559 Model # KEY903 Smart keypad Item # 388562 Model # KDP901 Range extender Item # 388560 Model # REP901 Senior pendant Item # 235554 Model # PDT900 Smart button Item # 388563 Model # BTN900 The Iris Gen 1 devices still to be tested: Programmable thermostat Item 388565 Model # CT-101-L Utilitech siren Item # 4222360 Model # TSE07-1