Z-WAVE driveway sensor
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Anyone have luck getting a Z-WAVE contact sensor with contact closures working with IRIS?  I'm trying to get a Schlage RS100HC Z-WAVE device registered with IRIS and not having any luck.  Basically I'm trying to get a Dakota alert wireless motion kit to signal a contact closure which in turn will notify IRIS and then it can send an alert or turn on the lights.  I'm not tied to the RS100HC but need to be able to wire the contacts from the Dakota Alert system to a device that will work with IRIS.

 

Here is a link to a youtube video on what I'm trying to get working:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2z3810t3nbU

 

 

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I don't have experience with either the Dakota or Schlage products you've mentioned.  However, I do find it intriguing that the Dakota unit provides both NO and NC connections for the PIR sensors.

 

I'm not surprised you couldn't pair with the Schlage Z-wave.  Instead of using the Schlage contact sensors, you can actually tap into the IRIS contact sensors with a bit of hacking.  The IRIS contact sensors don't come with an extra NC/NO loop like the Schlage does but if you're half-decent with soldering skills, you can attach wires at the ends of the reed switch of the contact sensor.  Then connect those wires to the COM / NC connectors (instead of the NO configuration in your video) of the Dakota unit, and voila!, you've accomplished what you need with native IRIS devices!  The IRIS contact sensors are NC devices (Normally-Closed).

 

I performed this exact hack for my IRIS system - my IRIS motion detectors kept false-alarming from time to time.  I replaced all my IRIS motions with professional security detectors from Honeywell and Bosch using this exact method.

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IMAG0279

 

 

I had to change the battery on mine so I got the opportunity to take mine apart again.  It's on a test bench and I pulled up the wire to illustrate what I did.

 

If yo look at the long, narrow component on the left of the button - that's the magnetic "Reed" component.  In proximity of the magnet the switch within is closed.  When the magnet is removed, the switch is open.  All you'd have to do is connect wires to it (or remove the switch completely) and connect it to devices that expect NC operation.  Effectively all you're doing is bypassing the Reed on the IRIS contact, and depend on another device to close a switch for you.

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Thanks G35Rider...Works great on the bench and I see no reason this shouldn't work installed in the driveway.  Attaching photos for others to view.  Used  Dakota Alert DCMA 2500 wireless motion Transmitter and Receiver connected to an IRIS contact sensor.

 

 post-514-0-47280600-1416280653_thumb.jpg

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This is great.  I had considered trying exactly this but hadn't gotten around to looking for a motion sensor that would trigger a switch closure.   This trick could be used to turn anything with a switch closure into a Z-wave device.  G35Rider can you share what devices you're using?  It would be great to compile a list of devices that work with this hack.

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This is great.  I had considered trying exactly this but hadn't gotten around to looking for a motion sensor that would trigger a switch closure.   This trick could be used to turn anything with a switch closure into a Z-wave device.  G35Rider can you share what devices you're using?  It would be great to compile a list of devices that work with this hack.

 

Most security motion sensors are based on switch closures so any sensor with a relay specification of "Form A" or "Form C" (which accounts for probably 98% of all motion sensors) fall into this category.  "Form A" sensors have COM/C and NC while "Form C" has both COM/C, NC, and NO.  This hack works in the NC configuration so sensors with either types of relays are useable.  If you already have an inactive, wired alarm system with motion sensors, simply tap into its C/NC wires at the panel.

 

My preference of current-generation motion sensors, the ones I use in my home, are the following:

 

Bosch Blue Line Gen2 Tritech

 

Honeywell DT7435

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Does anyone have a hack for something similar to this for an existing security system? Im thinking since the siren output on my alarm is 12volt dc then just use that to also drive a 12 volt relay and then then tie this door switch across a set of NC contacts on the relay. Alarm goes off, siren sounds and also send control 12volts to the relay opening the NC contacts making the door switch think something is happening and I use it to send me a text message. Make sense??? Thanks Jon

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Does anyone have a hack for something similar to this for an existing security system? Im thinking since the siren output on my alarm is 12volt dc then just use that to also drive a 12 volt relay and then then tie this door switch across a set of NC contacts on the relay. Alarm goes off, siren sounds and also send control 12volts to the relay opening the NC contacts making the door switch think something is happening and I use it to send me a text message. Make sense??? Thanks Jon

 

 

If your alarm is DSC Power Series or Honeywell Vista - just get EnvisaLink and it would text and e-mail you on any event, including alarm.

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Well, that just sounds weird to use siren output like that. EnvisaLink service is free (you only pay for the board) and lets you know by sending you test and e-mail if your alarm system status changes. And it's way more reliable than Iris.

 

Now if you want an alternate "communicator" by the means of Iris - you can use one of the program outputs of your system (PGM on DSC or "trigger" on Honeywell) to power a relay. For DSC that would be PGM programmed as 01 - fire/burglary output.

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Im trying to put several things under 1 blanket cover. I have 2 different camera systems and now IRIS. Was trying to get away from another "service"

 

I personally use 2 different ones myself and I LIKE IT that way. If one fails I have another to go to as a backup. I've never like all my eggs in one basket, same goes for ANY INVESTMENT you make. 

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"Now if you want an alternate "communicator" by the means of Iris - you can use one of the program outputs of your system (PGM on DSC or "trigger" on Honeywell) to power a relay. For DSC that would be PGM programmed as 01 - fire/burglary output."

 

And do what with this output? Is there a separate independent input thats available for iris? Or tie it into the door sensor like I have the relay off the siren tied to?

 

ITATodd, i understand not having everything in one basket but it was becoming a hassle juggling emails texts apps and settings for the cameras(2 dlinks that send emails on motion, and 4 lorex cameras that are connected to dvr that also sense motion and send text) and automation i already had. The camera systems will still be separate from IRIS but i would like the IRIS feature to help monitor the activation of the alarm.

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"Now if you want an alternate "communicator" by the means of Iris - you can use one of the program outputs of your system (PGM on DSC or "trigger" on Honeywell) to power a relay. For DSC that would be PGM programmed as 01 - fire/burglary output."

 

And do what with this output? Is there a separate independent input thats available for iris? Or tie it into the door sensor like I have the relay off the siren tied to?

Correct - tie it to a relay for the "door sensor".

 

Connecting relay to a siren output is a bad idea since it will mean that your siren supervision won't work. Normally alarm systems allows some low voltage like 1-2V to flow thru the siren circuit so if siren gets disconnected - alarm panel will display a trouble "bell circuit" letting you know that there is a problem. With the relay - it would just shunt the siren and you'll never know it's gone bad or there is a cut in the line.

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I had to change the battery on mine so I got the opportunity to take mine apart again.  It's on a test bench and I pulled up the wire to illustrate what I did.

 

If yo look at the long, narrow component on the left of the button - that's the magnetic "Reed" component.  In proximity of the magnet the switch within is closed.  When the magnet is removed, the switch is open.  All you'd have to do is connect wires to it (or remove the switch completely) and connect it to devices that expect NC operation.  Effectively all you're doing is bypassing the Reed on the IRIS contact, and depend on another device to close a switch for you.

 

This picture was worth way more than a thousand words. Using this hack - soldering a pair of wires onto an IRIS door sensor - allows the sensor to be used for any normally-closed circuit to sense when the contact is opened. Many thanks, G35Rider, this is exactly what I needed. I didn't have the guts to go poking around in the circuitry, but as they say, "the second mouse gets the cheese."

 

In my case, I have door and window magnetic reed switches hard-wired into my house from an old ADT or some such alarm system, and it as a shame to have to go sticking magnets and radio contactors all over the place (also expensive) when the things already are installed. What you do, of course, is wire the existing magnetic reed switches from the doors, windows, whatnot, in series, and connect the two loose ends across the reed switch on your sensor. Works like a charm. You can sub-divide into front door/back door/dining room windows/etc if you want detail, or combine them ("2nd floor windows", for example).

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just watch for the total resistance of the resulting circuit... it may not reliably register closure once you have like 20 zones combined into one (depends on the wiring, standard alarm cable (red, black, yellow, green) is normally 22 AWG but sometimes 18 AWG is used).

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This picture was worth way more than a thousand words. Using this hack - soldering a pair of wires onto an IRIS door sensor - allows the sensor to be used for any normally-closed circuit to sense when the contact is opened. Many thanks, G35Rider, this is exactly what I needed. I didn't have the guts to go poking around in the circuitry, but as they say, "the second mouse gets the cheese."

 

In my case, I have door and window magnetic reed switches hard-wired into my house from an old ADT or some such alarm system, and it as a shame to have to go sticking magnets and radio contactors all over the place (also expensive) when the things already are installed. What you do, of course, is wire the existing magnetic reed switches from the doors, windows, whatnot, in series, and connect the two loose ends across the reed switch on your sensor. Works like a charm. You can sub-divide into front door/back door/dining room windows/etc if you want detail, or combine them ("2nd floor windows", for example).

 

Cool!  Glad this was helpful to your project!  :)  

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