IRIS Being shut down by Lowe's??
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Yeah that looked promising but it seems to have died. But also a bit concerned they could shut the servers down and you are left with nothing again. Unless it is close to no entry fee to start with that system I my still be forced to move to ST. As a side note, has anyone looked into Hubitat? Seems like a pretty open system that maybe someone could make old Iris devices work on.

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On 11/22/2018 at 8:12 PM, Wlepse said:

I can't imagine there is any IP worth buying. It isn't like Iris was doing anything novel that others were not. 

And therein lies another serious flaw.  Iris went from being a market leader with the AlertMe/V1 platform to a platform seeking it's purpose for existing.   Nevertheless, there could be some licensing agreements and partnerships with value.  I doubt the latter since the LG/Iris partnership that was hyped at CES a couple years ago vaporized.

20 hours ago, Wlepse said:

As a side note, has anyone looked into Hubitat? Seems like a pretty open system that maybe someone could make old Iris devices work on.

Hubitat has come a very long ways in it's nearly year lifetime.  It's backed by some of the most qualified community developers from the SmartThings community.  It's biggest strength is that there is no cloud dependency.  This also is, in my opinion, it's biggest weakness too.  There is no remote access; it's up to the user to create a VPN tunnel for accessing the hub.  There are virtually no integrations with cloud connected systems like Ring, Arlo, LG, Chamberlain, etc.

When I ditched Iris I learned that it was a bad idea to become dependent on any single platform.  The migration cost several thousand but was money well spent.  For the rebuild I diversified on 3rd party platforms that had integrations with SmartThings..  For example, I chose Philips hue for all lighting since it runs local and uses ZLL which is more more responsive for lighting applications than ZHA.  Those garbage Sylvnia Lightify bulbs are prone to Zigbee buffer overlows which makes them terrible routers and can completely screw up a Zigbee network   I chose Arlo because I needed off-site cloud storage with local recording, but wanted the motion sensors on the cameras to trigger automations.  Lastly, Harmony for controlling TV's and Ecobee for the thermostat.  All of these systems work completely independent of SmartThings, yet can be controlled, monitored, and automated within ST when needed.

If Hubitat supported all of those platforms I would switch in a heartbeat.  I can extend my ArloPilot app to support full platform integration, but I'm sure Arlo would shut me down eventually.  Instead I recently migrated to the ST v3 hub which is Zigbee 3.0 compliant including QR code pairing and Z-Wave v5 with NWI (Network Wide Inclusion).  NWI is a huge plus, you can include Z-Wave devices from anywhere on the network...  During the migration to ST v3 I was able to pair every single device in place, including Z-Wave locks that were over 50 feet from the hub.

 

By the way, Lowe's is having a fire sale (55% off) on Iris v3 devices right now.  Not good.

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This issue with IRIS bailing out could cost me $4,150.00

I have 83 IRIS devices in use.  They are all and only  version one.  Version one just works reliably for me.  I jumped into IRIS in 2012.  I endured untold grief while they got their act together.

If I paid $20 average for each IRIS device, then I have spent $1,660.00 on IRIS.

In early 2014 I could see IRIS's incompetence never ending.  (Today, I have been proven right).  I decided to cover my rear, by purchasing Vera and using non proprietary zWave devices.  I have about 75 zWave devices in my Vera system.  Vera has been rock solid reliable for me.  And NO forced untested updates!!!!

But I stayed with IRIS (also) because zWave motion sensors, door sensors, keypads, etc are 3 times more expensive.

So to replace all of my proprietary AlertMe/IRIS devices could cost me $4,150.00 if there is never a buyer, or if the buyer can't get free royalties to the proprietary AlertMe/IRIS devices.

Yes, there could be a buyer....  and we could see a heavy price for the AlertMe monthly royalties...   and need to walk away.

I have somewhere to go (Vera).   I won't be homeless.  But I could be financially broken.

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On ‎11‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 8:06 PM, Vettester said:

Now that Lowe's has announce their plans for Iris, I won't be spending any more money at Lowe's.  It's time to go back to “More saving, more doing… That's the power of the Home Depot.”

Might be time to update your tag line too. :-)

 

But maybe someone will come along and take it over that can offer us more. If they gave one last FW update that made device integration with ST and other systems easier that would be nice. Then not all our money would be down the drain. I know there are people with a lot more invested than me in Iris, but at over 70 devices it will be a big hit if I have to dump most or all of this hardware and start over. I have 18 motion sensors alone controlling lights all around the property, plus 23 switches they operate and 14 contact sensors on doors and windows, 5 smoke alarms, 4 leak detectors, 3 keypads, 2 cameras, and a bunch of spares/future use devices.

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9 hours ago, sparc said:

Might be time to update your tag line too. 🙂

But maybe someone will come along and take it over that can offer us more. If they gave one last FW update that made device integration with ST and other systems easier that would be nice. Then not all our money would be down the drain. I know there are people with a lot more invested than me in Iris, but at over 70 devices it will be a big hit if I have to dump most or all of this hardware and start over. I have 18 motion sensors alone controlling lights all around the property, plus 23 switches they operate and 14 contact sensors on doors and windows, 5 smoke alarms, 4 leak detectors, 3 keypads, 2 cameras, and a bunch of spares/future use devices.

I'll keep my signature as it is for now.  The email I received from SystronicsRF this morning sounds very promising, so we'll have to wait and see how this shakes out.

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The email was from these guys:

Here it is in its entirety:

Hi,
 
Thank you for registering an interest in our new home automation system. 
 
In parallel with completing the development and testing of the system, we have been working with partners on specific niche applications.  The recent news about Iris has prompted us to put all of our energies back into enabling the continued use of the earlier Iris and AlertMe devices for HA, alongside the more recent devices.
 
A new website, SystronicsRF.com, will be put online by the end of next week, December 7th.  The website describes the system features, how it can be used, and the thinking behind our approach, which we have also mentioned in previous posts.  Its content will also be expanded over time.
 
The target date for the release of a Beta version is mid-January, and we will explain the procedure for accessing this version ahead of time.
 
We are providing more information by email to those of you who have registered their interest in using the system via the video pages.  You will also be able to register your interest via the new website.
 
We have been building a complete solution, including the control system within the home, the supporting cloud-based services.  The solution has been built from the ground up, and the last stages have been the user interface and a website explaining all of the features. 
 
Most of the system is in place, is fully functional, and has been tested in real environments for the last 12 months, and we will be focusing totally on its release, once we have the website online.
 
We have opted for the name SystronicsRF, because it is a control system employing radio frequency electronic devices, which can be tailored through the software to several differing areas of application, both within the home, and elsewhere. 
 
The following are some further notes on the design and operation of the system: -
 
A Self-Contained System
 
The hub hardware is a Raspberry Pi 3B, to which USB based network adapters can be added, as required.  The software, for both the in-home control system, and the supporting cloud services, is written in Microsoft C#, has been developed in its entirety by us, and without any reliance being placed on any third-party software.
 
The in-home part of the system runs self-contained, and without any reliance on the cloud, or an internet connection.  Users are able to control the system operation locally via a mobile phone, tablet, or other WiFi device, connected directly via the home WiFi to the hub.  Supporting cloud services are provided, so that users can also control the system remotely, as required, and can use cloud services, such as Alexa, local weather, but none of these are essential for the normal everyday control and use of the system.
 
The hub software supports the current ZigBee protocol, as well as the earlier AlertMe and 1st generation Iris protocol.  It also supports the Z-wave protocol running at both the European and North American frequencies.  Most recently, it has been extended to support a local hub-based WiFi network, as distinct from the normal home WiFi.
 
The hub software is also intended to operate with any device from any manufacturer, so that users can employ the best combination of devices to suit their requirements. 
 
Each device has a predefined profile, which equivalent to the peripheral drivers found in PCs. 
 
These profiles enable the control system to operate within a standardised software environment, regardless of device manufacturer.  So far, the software has been tested successfully with more than 60 devices from over 30 different manufacturers.
 
User Interfaces
 
Most recently, the focus has been on the development of the user interface, which has been divided into two parts, one for everyday use, and the other for tailoring the system to each user’s needs.  All of the user interfaces are browser based, and access a web service running on the hub, in the same way as a conventional website, and via a local SSL connection.
 
Everyday use in this context includes switching devices on and off, such as lights and other powered devices, and enabling or disabling automated actions, such as overnight security, heating and other schedules, as well as boosting the heating, etc.  This everyday user interface is based on responsive website design technology, which optimises the page layout to suit the screen of the device being used, from mobile phones to wide screen monitors.
 
The design of the automated actions, and the setting up of the features for the everyday use of the system, are undertaken via a separate user interface.  Following the general trend towards the use of larger screen devices for these aspects, they are only made available on larger screen devices, and not on mobile phones.  Responsive website design technology is still employed, to cater for different screen sizes, but the functionality is disabled when the screen size is less than that of a 10” tablet in a portrait orientation.
 
Action Designer & IDE
 
In practice, the automated actions consist of the actual actions, which control the devices, and a user interface layer, which we are calling activators.  In general, an activator can call any action, and an action can call any other action.  This approach enables the widest possible range of functionality to be provided, from a simple on / off switch through to the more complex applications, which can be built from a structure of actions.  The action designer enables these activators and actions to be defined by simple device selectors and conditional selectors. 
 
The system also includes an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), which enables much more complex applications to be created.  The devices are selected in the same way as for any other type of action, but the conditional statements are written in Microsoft C#.  These programs do not have to be compiled separately, such as with Microsoft Visual Studio, because the built-in IDE includes its own compiler.
 
We have also used these tools to create standard applications, such as for hot water and central heating control.
 
As with the normal everyday use of the system, the action designer and the IDE do not rely on any cloud services, or an internet connection, because they run in a self-contained manner on the hub.
 
Secure Web Services
 
Secure web services are provided in support of the system.  Each hub has an associated secure area within the cloud, through which all communications with then hub are made. 
 
For example, if the user chooses to access the system remotely, then they connect their mobile device to the web service in their secure area, and the requests from their browser are forwarded to the hub.
 
In addition to the normal cloud based firewall, the web service validates the received request, as does the hub.  The hub also only accepts request from the associated secure cloud based web service, and not from any other source.
 
Similarly, the hub sends its responses back to the secure cloud based web service, from where it is forwarded to the originating browser.
 
SSL connections are used between the user’s browser and the web service, and between the web service and the hub.
 
System Health & Security
 
Extensive self-monitoring features have been added to the system.  All of the connected devices are monitored for their battery level, where applicable, and to their signal strength and quality, etc.  The system also attempts to self-heal, wherever possible, before referring any issue back to the user.
Particular attention has also been given to protecting the system against radio frequency interference, including denial of service and the attachment of rogue devices.
 
The new website will be online by the end of next week, December 7th. 
 
Kind Regards,
 
Adrian
 
Adrian Scott
SYSTRONICSRF – Radio Frequency Networked Systems
Tel: +44(0)1635 876699
Mobile: +44(0)7799 893 613
adrian@systronicsrf.com | www.systronicsrf.com

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15 minutes ago, Vettester said:

intended to operate with any device from any manufacturer . . . conditional selectors . . .

Whoa! If this is real -- and priced well -- it opens up the platform in truly exciting ways. Thanks for sharing the info.

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Since my local store has a few of the newest generation of devices, I'm feeling drawn towards buying a few smart switches and making the changes the wife asked for.  Hopefully a buyer will be found, and it will be awesome.....I hope.

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We are system designers / software developers.  We plan to supply only the software, which you can run on a Raspberry Pi 3B / 3B+. 

The email in the earlier post from Vettester provides much more detail about the system, but a couple of points of clarification have also arisen:

1. Network Adapters

You will also need a separate USB dongle adapter for each network that you use.  That is, for AlertMe (Gen1) ZigBee, HA (Gen2) ZigBee and Z-Wave.  These plug directly into the Pi.  We will list the specific adapters that we’ve tested successfully so far on the website, and we will be testing more of them.  A WiFi interface, which is already built-in to the Pi, provides a protected WiFi network separate from the normal home WiFi, in a similar way to these other networks. 

2. Server Role

Although we have mentioned this in our email, it’s probably worth repeating that the in-home part of the system runs self-contained, and without any reliance on the cloud, or an internet connection.  

This includes the everyday use, such as switching devices on and off, the design of the automated actions, adding devices, and the setting up of the features for the everyday use of the system.

If the user wants to control the system remotely, then the hub can accept requests directly from a remotely located mobile device, still without involving the server.  The hub software safeguards the security of the system with a firewall, which can be locked down to specific mobile devices, and by validating all of the requests from the mobile device.

These requests from the mobile device can instead be routed via the server, for enhanced system security.  The hub then only accepts requests from the server, and all of the requests from the mobile device are routed via the server.  The Microsoft Azure firewall, a software firewall on the server, and server validation of the mobile device requests then provide an additional layer of security.

The user determines the mode to use via a setting in the hub software. 

SystronicsRF

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Will your mobile app have GeoFencing capabilities?  I realize that will require that the network is up at the time for it to function but that is 99% of the time at my house and GeoFencing for alarm states is very convenient, the fobs on past systems didn't check in enough to make them worth carrying in my opinion.

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5 hours ago, Terk said:

Will your mobile app have GeoFencing capabilities? 

I see no mention of a mobile app. I see only a web interface mentioned. This is the same principle as Hubitat which has seen a moderate level of success. 

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The short answer to your Geofencing questions is “Yes”, the system does have this capability. 

To work, the mobile phone has to be online to the web server, because it has to deliver the current GPS location data instantaneously to the server.  This requires a remote connection between the mobile phone and the web server.

The type of app should not have any bearing on the performance that you mentioned.  It’s probably due more to the implementation of the action running on the server, or possible weaknesses in the mobile phone / server connection.

In our system, the hub is the web server.  Whether the mobile phone connects to the hub via the local home WiFi, or remotely, via the internet, the operation is identical.

To provide the GPS data, the mobile phone first needs to have its location services enabled.  Any app, or web browser, running on the mobile phone, can then access the phone’s GPS data.  This GPS data is then forwarded to the server for comparison with the home location within an action.  The result of the comparison between the home location and the GPS location of the mobile phone determines the distance from home, which then triggers an event within the system, such as switching on the heating.  

It’s probably worth clarifying the different types of app, because the term “app” tends to be a source of confusion. 

There are three main types of app:  A native app, which is programmed to run on a specific type of device, such as Android, and does not require an internet connection.  A hybrid app, which is one that employs multi-platform technologies, such as HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, and is normally used as a wrapper for a web app.  A web app, which is no more than a website using responsible website design technology, so that the page layout can be adapted to suit the smaller screen of a mobile device.  It just requires a web browser running on the mobile phone as the user interface

We have developed both hybrid apps and web apps.  The main benefit of the hybrid app is that it can operate stand-alone, and without being connected to a server.  A web app can also be operated partially stand-alone, by employing the HTML5 offline mode to cache the server data locally.  The only other difference between a hybrid app and web app is that the user has to download the core of the hybrid app from an app store, whereas a web app just needs a link to the server program from within the web browser on the mobile phone.  Even if a hybrid app is used, it is often just used as a wrapper round a web app, because most of the functionality is in the web app. 

Home automation needs a hybrid app for Geofencing, because the mobile phone has to be in communication with the web server, so that the live GPS data can be sent immediately to the web server for processing.  the hybrid app running on the mobile phone merely sends this data to the server in the same way as any other browser request.

SystronicsRF

 

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If there is one last feature Lowes could give us before ditching IRIS, that would be IFTTT in my opinion.  It will give us room to adapt to new changes or transition out to another system.  I hope the IRIS team is listening...

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I don't have a big investment in IRIS, and I was a critic of the various issues a few years ago, but they all seemed to work out (became much more reliable)...at about the same time they started offering a free plan. I only use it for timers (lights on and off at certain time) and notifications of some temperature sensors and water sensors. Not regular security, no monitoring, no cameras (I do those through BlueIris). I haven't posted here in a while because everything has been working fine on my system...and without any interventions...it just hums away doing what it is supposed to do.

But this highlights the problem with anything cloud or service based...it changes ownership, vendors discontinue support, etc. How many of us have thrown out perfectly working devices of one kind or another because the manufacturer decided to drop support? I also worry a new vendor might drop the free plan, and/or raise prices. Anytime I see mention of one of the big security system names, I think $$$/mo.

The SystronicsRF solution sounds interesting....I'm already a RPi junkie, so that helps sell it :) I'll be signing up to keep updated.

 

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I have to hand it to Mike S. over on the Iris forum, he is trying to be reassuring, as seen below.  I'll try to be patient, and not get carried away with the sales.

 

Hi guys,

 

It is human nature to speculate and think about "worst case scenarios" but I would urge you to be patient for a little bit while; Iris isn't going anywhere, wish I could tell you more right now but as they say, stay tuned. 

 

-Mike

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On ‎11‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 11:44 AM, Compan-1 said:

The short answer to your Geofencing questions is “Yes”, the system does have this capability. 

To work, the mobile phone has to be online to the web server, because it has to deliver the current GPS location data instantaneously to the server.  This requires a remote connection between the mobile phone and the web server.

The type of app should not have any bearing on the performance that you mentioned.  It’s probably due more to the implementation of the action running on the server, or possible weaknesses in the mobile phone / server connection.

In our system, the hub is the web server.  Whether the mobile phone connects to the hub via the local home WiFi, or remotely, via the internet, the operation is identical.

To provide the GPS data, the mobile phone first needs to have its location services enabled.  Any app, or web browser, running on the mobile phone, can then access the phone’s GPS data.  This GPS data is then forwarded to the server for comparison with the home location within an action.  The result of the comparison between the home location and the GPS location of the mobile phone determines the distance from home, which then triggers an event within the system, such as switching on the heating.  

It’s probably worth clarifying the different types of app, because the term “app” tends to be a source of confusion. 

There are three main types of app:  A native app, which is programmed to run on a specific type of device, such as Android, and does not require an internet connection.  A hybrid app, which is one that employs multi-platform technologies, such as HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, and is normally used as a wrapper for a web app.  A web app, which is no more than a website using responsible website design technology, so that the page layout can be adapted to suit the smaller screen of a mobile device.  It just requires a web browser running on the mobile phone as the user interface

We have developed both hybrid apps and web apps.  The main benefit of the hybrid app is that it can operate stand-alone, and without being connected to a server.  A web app can also be operated partially stand-alone, by employing the HTML5 offline mode to cache the server data locally.  The only other difference between a hybrid app and web app is that the user has to download the core of the hybrid app from an app store, whereas a web app just needs a link to the server program from within the web browser on the mobile phone.  Even if a hybrid app is used, it is often just used as a wrapper round a web app, because most of the functionality is in the web app. 

Home automation needs a hybrid app for Geofencing, because the mobile phone has to be in communication with the web server, so that the live GPS data can be sent immediately to the web server for processing.  the hybrid app running on the mobile phone merely sends this data to the server in the same way as any other browser request.

SystronicsRF

 

My last three phones have all had the capability of enabling Wi-Fi when I reach a certain location, for me I have it set to home and work. So my question is can't you use that connection that the phone will make to the home Wi-Fi network to disable/enable the alarm and/or perform other functions?

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