SystronicsRF
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Looking over the FAQ again recently it appears you are still debating on the pricing model / design. I know personally the ability to remotely control things and be notified is pretty important, and I don't mind paying the monthly fee for such a service. This also ensures you have a steady stream of income to continue development and support coming in.
 

I'm not quite sure how the remote web interface works, but I do know some US ISPs filter inbound traffic unless you have a business plan as they don't want home users running web servers.

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Even if your ISP doesn't block traffic, I suspect the majority of Iris users bought it because it was easy to use. I think the further SystronicsRF diverges from that model the more users they will lose. I am also concerned that the closure of Iris is imminent, without some clear ideas of how this system will work or what it will cost I think you will force another chunk of the user base elsewhere. 

I know I have a lot of Gen1 devices that are useless outside of Iris or SystronicsRF, but right now I am not sure if I am willing to buy all the hardware needed for SystronicsRF ($200) not knowing what the recurring costs will be or even the capabilities of the system. Connecting these devices is great, but if some features aren't pre set up I am not sure I want to be bothered. For instance, the keypads, is the beeping firmware or is that part of the programming? Same for indication of status? I don't mind repairing these but if each function needs to be programmed I just don't have the time for that.

Ultimately I am hopeful but really hoping some solid details come soon!

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My concerns go like this:  I use only V1 products.  And 83 of them to boot.  I am already locked in to a product and a company, that if they (Lowes) go out of business, my system stops working, and my V1 parts can't be taken to another platform.

I won't jump to SystronicsRF  unless they SELL the firmware license.  AND unless the firmware does not phone home to authenticate. SO THAT if SystronicsRF  dries up, and them my Raspberry Pi breaks, I can just buy a new Pi, install my copy of the firmware, and be back in business without re-authenticating to a server that is dead and gone like Lowes is about to.

I made a mistake once, when I went with Lowes.  I won't be at SystronicsRF mercy.  They HAVE TO SELL me something that I own.  I don't mind even paying a BIG price like say maybe $100. I don't mind buying upgrades if I decide the features are something that I want.

 

 

 

 

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Ditto.

Once bitten, twice shy.

I've spent over $200 in preparation for implementing the software from SystronicsRF. Does it have a name yet? If not you need one. My first batch of Iris hardware was bought to support the version 1 Iris hub that is now a brick, and then I bought more when the V2 hub came out which will soon be a doorstop too. So I've already made a serious investment in SystronicsRF that I otherwise would not have made, though I realize none of that expense has gone to them.

I wonder if they will be offering hardware packages once they get rolling. That would make sense to me. Not that it was difficult to locate and purchase all the bits myself, but for others it might be easier to have a one stop shop where they get the hardware that they know will work along with the software. Just thinking out loud as they have already considered this option no doubt.

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2 hours ago, SystronicsRF said:

We have endeavoured to answer the questions raised by OhioYJ,  Wlepse, EyeRuss & Sparc on January 19th and 20th, 2019.  As the content is fairly long, these answers are on the following page on the website.

https://www.systronicsrf.com/q-and-a/january-21-19.html

Thanks for the info and for remaining engaged with this forum. It is really helpful to get regular updates so we all know where we stand. But with that said I hope you may be able to release more details about pricing to coincide with whenever the shutdown timing is presented by Iris. I am just concerned that while people know you have a potential solution, without knowing the costs they may just opt to move to another platform which will certainly affect your ability to stay in business. 

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Hub components ordered for this. Fingers crossed that this will ultimately be a better long term solution.  Looks good so far. Lots of great info on the SystronicsRF web page.  With 75 Iris components, I would be amendable to joining the Beta if still open.

 

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Seems like I read somewhere that the iris hub runs the linux busybox os. I don't know if that is even true, I can't find reference to it now, but I read it somewhere. I'm not familiar with busybox, but it appears to be a fairly common embeded linux platform.
If this were true, it would be amazing if someone figured out how to port systronic's software and somehow load it onto our V2 hubs!  But because it is written in C# I think it would require a complete rewrite or running it in something like mono... who knows if the iris hub even has the horsepower to do something like that...
The biggest hurdle for most users will be acquiring the necessary hardware and setting everything up. If there was an easy way to dump systronics on the iris hub, I would imagine they could swipe up a TON of iris users very quickly if they phase out the system.
This would be a great opportunity if lowes would work with systronics on something like this as sort of a severance package for the users they are hanging out to dry.

I know it's wishful thinking... it just sucks that we all already have a piece of hardware that has all the necessary network interfaces, and it'll be a doorstop if iris is shut down.

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21 hours ago, Smitho said:

Seems like I read somewhere that the iris hub runs the linux busybox os. I don't know if that is even true, I can't find reference to it now, but I read it somewhere. I'm not familiar with busybox, but it appears to be a fairly common embeded linux platform.
If this were true, it would be amazing if someone figured out how to port systronic's software and somehow load it onto our V2 hubs!  But because it is written in C# I think it would require a complete rewrite or running it in something like mono... who knows if the iris hub even has the horsepower to do something like that...
The biggest hurdle for most users will be acquiring the necessary hardware and setting everything up. If there was an easy way to dump systronics on the iris hub, I would imagine they could swipe up a TON of iris users very quickly if they phase out the system.
This would be a great opportunity if lowes would work with systronics on something like this as sort of a severance package for the users they are hanging out to dry.

I know it's wishful thinking... it just sucks that we all already have a piece of hardware that has all the necessary network interfaces, and it'll be a doorstop if iris is shut down.

Unfortunately, running the new software on the Iris V2 hub is a non-starter.  The capability of the Raspberry Pi 3B is far greater than that of the Iris V2 hub, and it needs that capability to function.

The main differences are:

    The Iris V2 hub has a single core 32 bit processor running at 1.0 GHz.
    The Pi 3B has a quad core 64 bit processor running at 1.2 GHz.

The Pi 3B also has a Micro SD card, which serves the function of a hard disk.

We’ve added this page to the website, which contains a more detailed explanation:

https://www.systronicsrf.com/q-and-a/january-26-19.html

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That's probably the reason why they couldn't implement local processing, didn't have the brain power in the hub to handle it.

Which if true would mean they never had any intention on enabling local processing when the V2 hub was spec'd out and anything they said to the contrary was bull hockey.

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First of all thanks for continuing to follow up on these threads. But I do have a question; your system specifically needs (2) zigbee USB controllers, one for old gen devices one for new. But your description of the Iris hub indicates they only have one. Do you have any idea how they are handling that?

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We had recommended the HomeSeer SmartStick as the preferred Z-Wave USB network adapter for use in the USA.  This was based on the adapter having been successfully tested, its performance, brand, price, and its availability.

A member of the forum attempted to purchase a HomeSeer SmartStick last week, and the only one available was priced at more than $90.00.

We had been purchasing them from Amazon (USA) last year for $35.00, but they are now showing as “Currently unavailable” on Amazon.

The HomeSeer SmartStick is still available online directly from HomeSeer for $40.00.

We were already recommending the Aeotec Z Wave adapter for UK (868 MHz version) use, and we have changed our recommendation to the Aeotec Z-Wave for use in the USA (908 MHz version).

It's probably worth mentioning that there is a significant difference between Z-Wave adapters and ZigBee adapters.

The interface that is presented by a Z-Wave adapter to the hub is more standardised than that for a ZigBee adapter.  This is mainly because the Z-Wave adapters all use the same Sigma chip, whereas different chips can be used in the ZigBee adapters.

In practice, every Z-Wave adapter that we have tested conforms to the same interface standard.  Most, if not all, Z-Wave adapters should work with the control system, whereas each type of the ZigBee adapter has to be profiled individually to communicate with the control system.

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15 hours ago, Wlepse said:

First of all thanks for continuing to follow up on these threads. But I do have a question; your system specifically needs (2) zigbee USB controllers, one for old gen devices one for new. But your description of the Iris hub indicates they only have one. Do you have any idea how they are handling that?


The Digi XStick is a fully functional ZigBee coordinator.  Each XStick can be configured by the hub processor to behave as either an MSP coordinator, or an HA coordinator, but not both.  Hence, there has to be two adapters, one for AlertMe / Iris Gen 1 (MSP), and for more modern devices (HA).

We are not familiar with the EM3587, which is used in the Iris V2 hub, but the hub processor could be more directly involved in the coordinator function.  Perhaps this is why the Iris hub processor is able to switch between MSP and HA operation.

As well as placing less load on the hub processor, having two USB network adapters also shares the load on each adapter, especially for systems containing a significant number of both Gen 1 and Gen 2 devices.

The number of processor cores in the hub also plays into this.  When a frame of data arrives from a networked device, it has to be processed as a priority by the hub.  In the single core Iris hub processor, the current process has to be interrupted to service the incoming data whenever it arrives.

With the quad-core Raspberry Pi running multi-threaded programs, the tasks are shared.  Other cores can continue to service other USB adapters and undertake other processing tasks, with much less likelihood of them being interrupted.
 

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I've been wanting to get a Raspberry for some time so I guess it's now.  Complete set of preferred hardware ordered!  I'm also willing to beta as I can setup my workshop, which has 35 devices on a separate system without upsetting the household. 

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If you've been wanting a Pi for a while I suggest you buy two as one will be dedicated to the HA system and not capable of doing much else. So if you desire has been to experiment with a Raspberry Pi get a second one.

For myself I never had an interest in them, but now that I have one and have set it up while waiting for the SystronicsRF software to be released I have played with it a bit. I have an Intel Compute Stick which is similar (but smaller) and runs Windows 8.1 (current model ships with W10), has built in Wi-Fi, BT, USB3, and a Micro SD slot and comes in a fanned case with a power supply. It does cost a bit more than the Pi but it's all there. I added a BT KB and mouse from Logitech and plugged it into one of the HDMI inputs on the 32" wall-mounted TV in the kitchen. Now we just toggle over to HDMI1 and have a full blown windows computer in the kitchen. I have MS Office, Google Earth Pro, Chrome, and other software loaded and they all run fine. If you didn't know it was smaller than your average TV remote you'd think it was a desktop computer except for the fact you can't see it hiding behind the TV. I use Chrome Remote Desktop to connect to the other computers in the house and do whatever I want just like I was sitting in front of them.

I'm using it right now to enter this post.

 

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/boards-kits/compute-stick.html

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1 hour ago, sparc said:

If you've been wanting a Pi for a while I suggest you buy two as one will be dedicated to the HA system and not capable of doing much else. So if you desire has been to experiment with a Raspberry Pi get a second one.

Interesting.  Thanks.

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4 hours ago, sparc said:

If you've been wanting a Pi for a while I suggest you buy two as one will be dedicated to the HA system and not capable of doing much else. So if you desire has been to experiment with a Raspberry Pi get a second one.

For myself I never had an interest in them, but now that I have one and have set it up while waiting for the SystronicsRF software to be released I have played with it a bit. I have an Intel Compute Stick which is similar (but smaller) and runs Windows 8.1 (current model ships with W10), has built in Wi-Fi, BT, USB3, and a Micro SD slot and comes in a fanned case with a power supply. It does cost a bit more than the Pi but it's all there. I added a BT KB and mouse from Logitech and plugged it into one of the HDMI inputs on the 32" wall-mounted TV in the kitchen. Now we just toggle over to HDMI1 and have a full blown windows computer in the kitchen. I have MS Office, Google Earth Pro, Chrome, and other software loaded and they all run fine. If you didn't know it was smaller than your average TV remote you'd think it was a desktop computer except for the fact you can't see it hiding behind the TV. I use Chrome Remote Desktop to connect to the other computers in the house and do whatever I want just like I was sitting in front of them.

I'm using it right now to enter this post.

We agree with you 100% about having a dedicated Raspberry Pi.  

Two years ago, when we started looking into HA, we thought the Pi was just for kids and hobbyists.  Not so.  It has a similar capability to a desktop computer.  

Although they are targeted at different markets, both the Pi 3B+ and Intel Compute Stick have a quad core, 64 bit, 1.4 GHz processor, and a Micro SD card.

They both show the direction in which the technology is moving, which is changing the approach to HA entirely.
 

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43 minutes ago, thegillion said:

@mikeyc With Irs shutting down I am going to wait for the code to come out and start my own up.

You've got some great background here, so keep us posted!

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