Arcus Smart Home
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I have the Iris Petsmart dog door via the Iris app I was able to lock/unlock the dog door remotely. It was a great way to control how much time my dogs spent outside (barking/digging) but get them outside if I was running late. I relied on this door once my job changed and I couldn't come home at lunch anymore.

Is there a new open source app one can use to control the products through the Iris hub?

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Yes, Arcus appears to have all the same code from Iris around petdoors, but I don't have one to tinker with. Your options are 1) port petdoor driver to your platform of choice 2) use Arcus (only if you are very technical) 3) find someone else to run Arcus for you.

AFAIK, I'm still the only one running Arcus in production since Iris shut down on March 31st, so your option is likely on #1.

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7 hours ago, AndrewX192 said:

The closest that exists today is https://github.com/wl-net/arcus-k8 - which is a set of scripts to setup Arcus on kubernetes. Some people are still struggling to get it working, but at present I believe that is the easiest option.

So, a quick first glance of this looks like the requirements are pretty high.  Initially I was thinking that we would be able to flash the Iris Hub, connect it to the network, configure everything and be set.  That seems to have been a bit naive of me.  The hub appears to work as a point of contact for Zigbee, ZWave, and camera devices, and not much more, while all connectivity and logic are run on a server.  Looking at the diagrams here, there seem to be quite a few more services than I expected.  As someone who has done this, can you comment on the hardware requirements?  Is 12GB of ram really necessary?  I was thinking of adding these containers to a box I have up, but it probably only has 4GB of ram, so that might be unrealistic.  I might end up going an entirely different route, since the only thing I'm really trying to get connected is my door and window sensors.

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Correct - the IRIS platform is a lot like smartthings, in that the hub is mostly a bridge between devices (be they zigbee, zwave, etc.) and the internet, with some local processing for alams. Currently, I wouldn't recommend running Arcus with less than 12GB of ram, but I suspect there's work that could be done to bring it down to a comfortable 8GB, and then 6GB - the challenge is that Kubernetes itself (which is used to manage Arcus) is resource intensive, and particular services like the drivers service and subsystem service are built for a level of scale that <10 users is completely overkill for. For example, the thread pools and paritions counts default to 64-128, so there's potentially some overhead there.

What I'd like to see is more functionality on the hub itself (so that the cloud dependency is not so critical) - specifically: being able to arm when cloud is down, schedules, and some primitive rules. With the IH300 hub this should be possible since it has 2X the ram, but the IH200 which most people have may be a bit more tricky.

Currently it doesn't really matter how many devices you have connected, although the number of different devices you use may have some baring due to the way drives are loaded. Perhaps removing these drivers would help? Anyway, for context my production environment has 3 homes running on it, with ~100 devices in total, and sits at about 9GB of ram used. Thankfully Arcus is not CPU intensive, however Kubernetes currently is - although I think migrating to k3s will help.. A cheap old Lenovo ThinkPad (e.g.a T420) with 8-16GB may be a good target to run Arcus on in the future. I don't expect that we'll ever get to raspbery pi territory, even for reasons beyond memory (I'm aware of the 4GB version), because of Cassandra database writes and SD card wareout.  

Edited by AndrewX192
typos

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