Device that can show power failure
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I am using Hubitat now (but am investigating SystronicsRF). I miss the ability of all versions of Iris hubs to be able to notify you of a power failure. They could do this because they had internal backup batteries. I've not found anything else that can do that. I would think any device that had an internal battery- such as the Iris range extender- could do that- as in send a message back that it had switched to battery from AC. Has anyone found a solution to this?

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1 hour ago, Spott5000 said:

I am using Hubitat now (but am investigating SystronicsRF). I miss the ability of all versions of Iris hubs to be able to notify you of a power failure. They could do this because they had internal backup batteries. I've not found anything else that can do that. I would think any device that had an internal battery- such as the Iris range extender- could do that- as in send a message back that it had switched to battery from AC. Has anyone found a solution to this?

Yeah. Years ago I took an IRIS Gen 1 door sensor, and de-soldered the reed switch that closes when the magnet is near. Throw the reed switch away.

Then I got me a relay that has a 120 volt ac coil.  I ran two wires from the relay contacts (normally open) to the door sensor where the reed switch used to be.  I soldered an unused ac power cord to the relay coil, and plugged the relay into the ac power plug.  When there is ac power, the relay contacts are closed, and the door sensor is thinking the door is closed.

When the ac power fails, the relay contacts open, and the door sensor thinks the door has just been opened, and sends me a notification email saying "THE POWER IS OFF"

Later when the power comes back on, the relay contacts close.  The door sensor thinks the door has been closed.  I get a email message "THE POWER HAS BEEN RESTORED"

There are zwave door sensors out there that have those green screw contacts built in.  On those, you don't even have to remove the reed switch.  Just throw away the magnet, and strip wires, and insert wires into the door sensor, and the other end soldered to the switch contacts of the relay.

If this sounds like too much work, then pay three neighbors to call you every time the power is out.  There isn't any soldering required.

p.s. EVERYTHING of yours has to be on some type of UPS...   Your Home Automation Hub, Network switches,  Router, Cable modem, etc. etc. or it can't work.

I had this on IRIS.  Right now I have it on SystronicsRF, and of course it works perfectly.

 

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14 hours ago, Vettester said:

lIf you add an external backup battery to your Hubitat hub you shouldn't have to worry about power issues. 

https://community.hubitat.com/t/backup-battery-ups/13582

Most of these solutions will continue will to provide power significantly longer than the 4 AA batteries that were in the Iris hub.

You may not have to worry about power issues for the hub, but to me getting a notice that power is out at the house lets me know other systems may need my attention. For me a power failure would mean no water, and my TV DVR, Security DVR, and computers are now running on their UPSs so will have limited run time. If it's Winter then maybe a cold house or frozen pipes will be an issue soon. 

When no one is home to handle these situations it's nice to get a notification. My backup to Iris was/is the Sense Home Energy Monitor. I get a message from Sense telling me that power is out at the house.

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Like @sparc says it's important for me just to know my power is off. It usually happens when the weather is bad- and if my sump pump quits, it's a big problem. I have all my network stuff on a UPS. That's easy. But like I said, Iris knew when the power went off and sent me a message.

@EyeRuss, Your solution looks like it would work perfectly- albeit a bit less than elegant. That might be my only option though. It just seems like there must be some device with a built in battery (for example the iris range extender or maybe a siren or something) that might achieve the same goal.  Something with a built in battery that could send a notification if it switched to battery mode. I may wind up using your idea @EyeRuss, but I'm going to keep looking- if I find a solution I'll post it.

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hmmmmm.  assuming your HE has power backup , you could use a plug in outlet that has power draw capability, use it to power something that always has a power draw like an alarm clock, then set up a rule in RM to  send you a notification if power drops below a certain level to 0....  

I may do this myself now!

EDIT: I posted before my morning coffee.  Duh.. this wont work as the plug needs power to report.   Maybe a polling rule where no response from the polled device  would trigger the alert.  I may play with this later.. 

 

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I bought a USP Power Loss Sensor and simply connected the yellow and black wires to the two terminals in the Ecolink Z-Wave Plus Door/Window contact sensor then setup a Rule Machine rule : when the sensor is open on true send a Pushover message that the power is out and on false send a Pushover that the power returned.  This works great and was very easy to setup in about 5 minutes.  Of course my Hubitat hub is connected to a UPS and the Power Loss Sensor is just plugged straight into an outlet.

The Power Loss Sensor pretty much snapped into the bottom of the Door/Window sensor so I didn't even bother taping them together since I don't expect it to get moved or bumped much were I have it, but they could be taped together for better rigidity.

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What is the component inside the little black box so to speak, a SPDT mechanical relay with a coil or a solid state relay?

Their product data sheet leaves a lot to be desired.  https://www.surveillance-video.com/media/lanot/attachments/customimport/PLS.pdf

This is the extent of the information provided:

• Detects loss of power (110 VAC)
• Dry Contact Output
• SPDT

When power is applied the NC contacts are held open, and when power is removed (in this case by a power failure) then the relay returns to its shelf state or NC correct?

If it's a mechanical relay you then have a coil that is energized 24/7. Many relays are not rated for this type of service, even ones intended for industrial use and costing thousands of dollars. I say that because I worked on a project replacing hundreds of relays in an industrial setting that were used in a similar manner. A significant number of those relays started to fail; some in a couple years but the majority of the population after 10 years; and the trend caught the eye of management who initiated the relay replacement project. The failures included sticking bobbins due to swelling in the coils from overheating caused by being energized 24/7 for years. A few were close to catching on fire after they overheated and melted the plastic relay case. Most of the coils that failed were powered by 125V DC or 120V AC, which is what you're working with here.

Now your setup is not used in an industrial setting I know but the coil doesn't know or care about that. If those two thousand dollar relays that were designed and tested for service that included being energized for extended periods of time (years) could fail how will your $25 relay fair in a similar situation? Time will tell. Just keep an eye on them is all I am saying. If you have an IR temperature gun maybe record some temperature readings from a deenergized state then every few hours for 24 hours (or longer) and see what happens. Given the way the PLS is marketed it is intended for this type of service (normally energized), but with no information on their website or the product datasheet they bear watching.

The solution for them was to institute as scheduled relay replacement program where all the relays were not only inspected and operationally tested periodically but also replaced regardless of their condition at specific intervals based on their operating conditions.

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4 hours ago, sparc said:

Most of the coils that failed were powered by 125V DC or 120V AC, which is what you're working with here.

The relay is powered by 12v DC which the transformer supplies.

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I have this one: https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1000PFCLCD-Sinewave-Outlets-Mini-Tower/dp/B00429N192/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_3

I have pretty good power which rarely goes down and usually only for a short time. It powers my Hubitat hub and everything necessary to keep my internet connection working. All that stuff draws little power so it will keep it working for a long time and nothing has to reboot. It's primary purpose is to keep my security system up and running if the bad guy(s) turn off my power which they have been known to do in an attempt to defeat an alarm system.

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Soldering wires is not my thing, so here is a simple solution that does not involve your hub.

Short story: create a free account on uptimerobot.com to ping your router using the router’s dyndns URL, and send you an email when it fails (if you want a text, use email-to-text address for your mobile number). 

Power down > router down > ping fails > get a text.  Problem solved.

Where's the catch?: if you already have a dynamic DNS service for your router (or a static IP), you’re all set.  If not… there could be some cost involved.  You could subscribe to one, but you probably don’t want to shell out $40/year to Dyndns.com, so…. there are some router models that come with free dyndns service included.  You can replace your existing router with a new one, or get a second router, and chain-link the two...obviously the one getting pinged should not be on a UPS.

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11 hours ago, virtu789 said:

Power down > router down > ping fails > get a text.  Problem solved.

This is a good idea, but it doesn’t necessarily mean your system is down.  Hubitat will continue to run locally without an internet connection.

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It is a good way to know if the internet went down though.  The only downside is I would need to turn on ICMP responses which I currently have off to attempt to limit the number of tries against it.

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13 hours ago, Vettester said:

This is a good idea, but it doesn’t necessarily mean your system is down.  Hubitat will continue to run locally without an internet connection.

Of course.  The OP's topic was detecting a power outage.  Technically this detects an internet outage, but one entails the other most of the time.  

EDIT:  actually you just made me think of a better idea.  If your primary router is on a UPS, and you use a secondary router for this, then ping both.  If only the secondary router down, that means you got a power outage, but if both are down, then you got an internet outage only. 👆

 

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8 hours ago, Terk said:

It is a good way to know if the internet went down though.  The only downside is I would need to turn on ICMP responses which I currently have off to attempt to limit the number of tries against it.

True.  Many routers have it off by default.  However, uptimerobot.com gives you several ping options, including an HTTP ping.

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