Some of your most innovative uses for iris devices:
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32 posts in this topic

1. We have motion sensors in our mailbox to tell when the mail comes (saw this previously on this forum).

2. We have bypassed the timer for our pool pump and took one of the 110 lines and use a GE Iris Switch to regulate and schedule the pump.

3. We use an ORBIT IRIS hose controller mounted in a waterproof box (that would hold irrigation equipment) and hard piped the in and out water outlets instead of using hoses.  We hardpiped the controller to a pipe in the pool system near the pump and put a backflow filter in.  NOW when we want to add water to the pool we can do it with IRIS and don't have to be there or have a hose hanging in the pool.  We can also schedule a water pattern to add water in small amounts to allow for evaporation.....

 

 

 

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The canned rules are all we have to work with. You might post your request to set your own temp values on the Iris Community Forum. I imagine that there are many on this blog who would go there and "Kudo" the request.
How did you determine where to place your sensor magnet inside the freezer, by measuring the depth of the door? I use the contact sensors in my freezers, but have not attempted to actually place the magnets with them to alert me if the door is left open.

I just eye balled it and adjusted sensors while watching on my iPhone in the app. It shows when sensors closed.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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On ‎4‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 3:56 PM, Home_Future said:

I mounted my Iris contact sensor in in the Freezer using heavy duty 3m double sided mounting tape. It seems to work much better for mounting sensors than what comes in the box.  My sensors kept falling off.  No longer a problem with this tape. 

The true test is within my Freezer,  so far so good. The contact sensor is staying mounted.  It alerts when the door is open and relays temperature when door is closed. No problems yet.  My only problem is configuring Iris Rules to alert below 20 degrees F.  That is as low as the canned rules will go.  My freezer is holding at -2 F.  I would like it to alert at like 10 F.  Is it possible to create more custom rules than what is found in the IPHONE App?   I'd like to set my own temperature values and have Iris notify me if the internal freezer temp rises above that value. Say 10 degrees F?

Any ideas?

 

It's possible that the lower limit is more than a software limit, meaning that the range or accuracy of the thermistor used to measure the temperature starts to stray too far off linear below 20°F to be considered accurate.

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The temp readings on a V1 contact sensor are accurate on the high end above the 105 limit. I've used these in the 130 to 140 range along side sensors designed to operate in that heat range and the V1 numbers are accurate. 

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On 7/22/2015 at 9:08 PM, Smitho said:

So, I have seen a few creative uses for devices, including:
Placing a contact sensor in the mailbox
A motion detector's temp sensor to trigger a ceiling fan.
 

I imagine pre-loading a toaster in the kitchen before bed and triggering it with a motion detector in the bathroom (but if nature calls, you might end up with an unexpected midnight snack)... besides, I prefer toaster strudels which should not be thawed.
I always see the coffee maker as an example, but every coffee maker we have ever owned had a timer built in already.
Most digital devices now can't simply turn on when plugged in... for instance our coffee pot and TV's would have to be manually powered on after the power was interrupted.

 

What are some other innovative ideas you have had with basic sensors and smart plugs which didn't involve dismantling a device?

Well, I believe Keurig K45 or K55 can auto-activate and deactivate. 

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2015 at 12:40 PM, hxn said:

Along the same lines as JoelH, I placed a 5x7" index card (vertically) over part of a vent in the basement, taped at the top with duct tape, and the small part of a contact sensor glued at the bottom. Just below that, I placed the main part of the sensor, so now when the furnace or AC is on, the card blows out and breaks the contact as long as the air is blowing. Since I subscribe to the Care package (only because it allows additional versatility), I can then look on the Care page and see a graph of the operation time of the HVAC. I can also confirm the current status of the furnace by looking at the overview page (On=open, Closed=Off). This is particularly useful if you have a situation where the temperature is a couple of degrees below the setpoint (in the case of AC) or vice versa (for heat), and you are wondering whether or not the HVAC has conked out. Oh, and by the way, you get a close approximation of the outlet temperature of the HVAC. So even if the blower is working but the compressor isn't, you can tell what is what. A great remote diagnostic tool!

I have a V1 contact switch and a V1 push button that I am not using that I think I will use to duplicate this in my house.

I'll use the push button as the return air temperature sensor since this doesn't require the contact actuation to log fan operation.

I bought a couple four packs of them online from Lowes a while back and use them for light switches and temperature sensors in various places.

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Not that innovative but I use a motion sensor in the garage to turn on an overhead light and turn it off after 2 minutes. It works great when coming home day or night as it provides hands-free lighting. The motion sensor is positioned so it detects the man door opening or the overhead door.

My neighbor has an Iris system too and he put a motion sensor in the dogs' house so he can tell if the dog is in there and monitor the temperature. He has one of those heating pads which is operated by a rule that monitors the temperature at the motion sensor.

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